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What's Fresh.

  • 18-5-2010

Thanks to Fresh Finesse, here's what’s fresh and best now in the markets:

 

Fruit

Apples- Pink Lady*

Apples – Granny Smith*

Bananas-local and QLD

Chestnuts*

Fuyu Fruit (Sweet Persimmon)*

Grapefruit-red flesh*

Kiwifruit*

Mandarin-Imperial

Oranges-Navel

Pears- Josephine*

Papaw and Papaya*

Passionfruit*

Rockmelon*

Watermelon*

 

Vegetables

Asian Vegetables*

Basil*

Broccoli*

Cauliflower*

Celery*

Cucumber-Continental*

Eggplant*

Fennel

Jerusalem artichoke*

Lettuce - cos*

Mushrooms-Flat*

Pumpkin -Jap (Kent) *

Silverbeet*

Spinach-English, baby*

Spring Onions*

Sweet potato*

Zucchini*

 *Indicates WA grown

 

Josephine pears:  Conical in shape, with skin changing from green to yellow as it ripens, the Josephine pear has creamy flesh with a rich aromatic flavour when ripe.  Eat fresh, use in cooking or combine with feta cheese, walnuts, English spinach and a simple vinaigrette dressing to make a simple salad to serve with crusty bread.

 

Sweet persimmons:  Adding a lovely Autumn glow to fruit displays, sweet persimmons are picked ripe and ready to eat and tend to be firm and crisp, unlike the more traditional variety which is initially firm and very astringent (tart) and must ripen to the texture of a squashy tomato before it can be eaten.  Sweet persimmons are easily recognisable by a large green calyx at the stem end.

 

Silver beet:  Abundant during the cooler months, Fresh silver beet has dark green, ribbed leaves and a crisp, creamy white fleshy stem. Sometimes confused with Spinach, Silver beet is more common in Australia because it’s more heat tolerant. Rainbow silver beet or chard is a spectacular version of this old favourite and comes with vividly coloured stems, hence the name. Silver beet is very rich in folate, so buy a big bunch and use it in pies and quiches, substantial winter salads or for colour and flavour in pastas and risottos. Remove the lower portion of the stalk before slicing and adding it to dishes.

 

Bean Shoots: These simple, pale coloured shoots are popular in a whole variety of Asian cuisines. They’re low in calories and a good source of protein, vitamin C and many of the B vitamins, so you can feel very virtuous as you chow down! Silky and moist in salads and brilliant for adding a nutty, cool crunch piled fresh on the top of a laksa or soup. Unused bean shoots will keep in water in the refrigerator for several days if the water is changed daily.

For further information visit www.freshf.com.au

 

Flourish encourages us all to buy local where possible. It's the best choice for you and your family, farmers and the environment.  Check back in later for a review of the Academy Award Nominee Best Documentary Feature 'Food, Inc.' http://www.foodincmovie.com/


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